Carlos Motta. San Felipe del Morro #10 from the series Colonial Forts and Ai Weiwei. Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn |  The Viktor Pinchuk Foundation Kyiv Ukraine
Zamir Suleymanov  Heavy words, 2016  three channel video, 5'20 |  The Viktor Pinchuk Foundation Kyiv Ukraine
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The Viktor Pinchuk Foundation: a place for dialogue and discovery.

‘Empowering future generations to become the change makers of tomorrow’ the foundation and its prize are the brainchild of billionaire philanthropist Victor Pinchuk'.

Ukraine’s capital city of Kyiv – Kiev in Anglicized spelling – has known a tumultuous past, to say the least.  

In the last 30 years alone, much has changed in the Ukraine: a shift from Russian domination to national independence, and the Ukrainian “Euromaidan” Revolution of 2014 being perhaps the most potent events. 

The sense of pride that such transformation brings about is often felt in the arts, too, and Kyiv’s contemporary arts scene is no different. But, surprisingly, in a city like Kyiv with such a grand and well-studied history, modern art is a bit harder to find. 

A good place to start exploring this side of the city is The Victor Pinchuk Foundation, founded in 2006.  It is the largest private philanthropic foundation in the Ukraine that focuses on education and healthcare as well as providing access to contemporary art and fostering Ukraine’s international integration. 

Located at the Pinchuk Art Centre, in a stately town house in the historic heart of Kyiv, the foundation awards a biennial art prize too, named the Future Generation Art Prize, for which both local and international artists can apply. In the past, names like Nástio Mosquito and Carlos Motta have been among the winners, and high-profile judges like Ai Wei Wei and Nicholas Serota have collaborated. 

With a mission formulated as ‘empowering future generations to become the change makers of tomorrow’ the foundation and its prize are the brainchild of billionaire philanthropist Victor Pinchuk. 

An innovative engineer in the metallurgic industries and a former elected member of the Ukrainian Parliament, Pinchuk has merged art and business ever since he retired – he even placed large-scale Olafur Eliasson installations amid a state-of-the-art steel mill in the Ukraine.

At The Pinchuk Art Centre, Pinchuk has gathered an impressive collection of 21st century art – the largest private art center in Central and Eastern Europe – which has made a palpable contribution to cultural participation and artistic emancipation in Ukraine. This open platform for artists, art work and society is a must-see that’s testament to Kyiv’s contemporary open-mindedness.

 

Pascale Martine Tayou Fingers, 2018 Photoprint, paper |  The Viktor Pinchuk Foundation Kyiv Ukraine
Ignas Krunglevicius  INTERROGATION, 2009  two channel video with sound, 13'  Courtesy of the Artist |  The Viktor Pinchuk Foundation Kyiv Ukraine
Nikolay Karabinovych  The Dead Pool Won't Ripple, 2019 found sleeves, welding, acrylic paint, postcard  Produced by PinchukArtCentre Nikolay Karabinovych  The Dead Pool Won't Ripple, 2019 found sleeves, welding, acrylic paint, postcard  Produced by PinchukArtCentre
Sergey Shabohin Zones of Repression, 2014 — 2019 ceramic tiles, lamp (exhibition copy)  Produced by Pinchuk Art Centre |Kyiv, Ukraine
Angelina Merenkova  From the Embroideries: Sex & Empire series  embroidered fabric  Courtesy of the Artist |  The Viktor Pinchuk Foundation Kyiv Ukraine Pascale Martine Tayou  Sisyphus Fabrik, 2018  Bronze |  The Viktor Pinchuk Foundation Kyiv Ukraine
Luba Tokareva  Untitled, 1994 table, chair, lamp, typewriter, feathers (exhibition copy)  Courtesy of the Artist. Co-produced by PinchukArtCentre

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